Paradox of married life

Added: Shannel Bornstein - Date: 22.07.2021 02:52 - Views: 25609 - Clicks: 3254

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Oxford Scholarship Online. Available in Oxford Scholarship Online - view abstracts and keywords at book and chapter level. Marriage has been declared dead by many scholars and the media. Marriage rates are dropping, divorce rates remain high, and marriage no longer enjoys the prominence it once held. Especially among young adults, marriage may seem like a relic of a distant past. Yet young adults continue to report that marriage is important to them, and they may not be abandoning marriage, as many would assume.

The Marriage Paradox explores both national U. Interspersed with real stories and insight from emerging adults themselves, this book attempts to make sense of the increasingly paradoxical ways that young adults are thinking about marriage. The combination of national trends, statistical findings, and quotations from emerging adults makes for a deep exploration of why we see the marital trends of today, and why they may not actually represent emerging adults moving away from marriage.

Brian J. Willoughby is considered an international expert in the field of couple and marital relationships, sexuality, and emerging adult development. His research generally focuses on how adolescents, young adults, and adults move toward and form long-term committed relationships.

Spencer L. As a family demographer, Dr. James is interested in the ways people form, maintain, and dissolve long-term romantic relationships, especially during emerging adulthood. He draws primarily on nationally representative longitudinal datasets and advanced statistical methods to answer questions about contemporary trends in marital and cohabiting relationships. Darcia Narvaez, Julia M. Braungart-Rieker, Laura E. Miller-Graff, Lee T. Gettler, Paul D. Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. It furthers the University's objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide.

Search Start Search. Choose your country or region Close. Dear Customer, As a global organisation, we, like many others, recognize the ificant threat posed by the coronavirus. Please contact our Customer Service Team if you have any questions. To purchase, visit your preferred ebook provider. Oxford Scholarship Online Available in Oxford Scholarship Online - view abstracts and keywords at book and chapter level. Election Willoughby and Spencer L. James Emerging Adulthood Series First attempt to explain through data and theory why emerging adults are retreating from marriage despite reporting that it is still important to them Gives voice to emerging adults' views on marriage with quotations from them throughout For the first time, fully describes the findings of a three-year, mixed-methods study on marriage among emerging adults Blends national data, research findings, and a focused sample of middle-class emerging adults.

James Emerging Adulthood Series. Also of Interest. Flourishing in Emerging Adulthood Laura M. Padilla-Walker, Larry J. Russell, Stacey S. Failure to Flourish Clare Huntington. Generation Disaster Karla Vermeulen. Sexuality in Emerging Adulthood Elizabeth M.

Morgan, Manfred H. Arterberry, Phillip J. Anne Marshall, Jennifer E. Literacy and Mothering Robert A. Rowe, Emily Dexter. Mann-Feder, Martin Goyette.

Paradox of married life

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The marital paradox